Kicking off July 2022 with Irrigation!

After record breaking rain in the Pacific Northwest this spring, yesterday was the day, we finally turned on our first irrigation pump of the year.

We got everything set up to water our newly planted green beans, turned the linear on, and turned the pump on. Then I turned to Matt, “You know what’s really nice? Watering on our own terms! I mean God, you’ve been great and all, but time for us to make a few water decisions around here for a change!”

Just for a comparison, in a normal year, we are hitting start on our pumps around April 15th and they pretty much don’t turn off for months. As farmers we are always thankful for water that comes free, but we are also thankful for our ability to spoon feed, to time applications, and do what’s best for the crops we have planted.

Summer Workers

School is out for the summer, and while we have camps and a few fun outings planned, most of our summer is full of work on the farm.

This week was a juggle of childcare so I got to take the boys out for a few hours to work with me. We checked a few (very tall) tall fescue fields and headed out to a newly planted orchard to count trees. We planted a number of new baby hazelnut trees this past winter, and most are looking great, but there are a few dead ones that will need to be replanted.

So Hoot, Auggie and I headed out to do some tallying. A skill Auggie was very proud to have learned this year in kindergarten.

This spring and moving now into summer has been a struggle with the weather and rising costs. It’s a very uneasy time to be a farmer with all that has hit us this year that is out of our control. But it’s also just really amazing to get to be outside, teaching your kids all about what you love to do and seeing how much they love it also!

Someday these summer workers will be full time around here….probably (as I’m told often) before I know it!

Planting Crimson Clover

We were able to get some crimson clover planted this past week. Crimson is by far one of the most beautiful crops that we grow, it’s the deep red (aka crimson colored) clover that blooms early in the spring. You know the one, it usually has folks out taking family pictures in it (hopefully with permission…haha).

Here is a brief video of how we did it this year.

Crimson clover is grown for seed on our farm. It is usually the first crop that we harvest in the summer and the seed is used for cover cropping, and wildlife and pasture mixes.

There is always a lot going on during the fall, planting is one thing that you always strive to get done early before it gets too late and too wet to get out onto the fields without getting stuck. Moving into fall we have had some warm sun and great rains; which hopefully will continue as we all work get finished up before winter. So far for me, it feels good to get at least one field off the list.

If you have any questions or comments, please drop them below!
Happy Friday!

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