It’s Nut Harvest Time!!

22 Sep

In the times of a pandemic, wildfires, flash floods and distance learning, we are also starting our final harvest of 2020. It is finally time to harvest hazelnuts at Kirsch Family Farms!

The filberts fall naturally from the trees when they are ready to be harvested. This year “naturally” meant they fell due to 50 mile an hour winds during a crazy storm we had a few weeks ago. Which brought wildfires and us being thankful our trees didn’t get burned to the ground.

Which led us to last week when we were thankful that the flash flood that came through skirted mostly to the west of us and didn’t float the nuts down into the drainage ditch. Meanwhile we are thankful that our harvester driver, (ahem…me) is super unreliable due to navigating pick ups and drop offs from 75 different places for my three children with this new “learning” that we’re currently doing because of the pandemic. Hoot our oldest son summed up life very well in this photo which is so far my favorite…I hear ya buddy…right there with ya!!

All dramatics aside, so far this year is looking good for our hazelnuts and we do actually have a ton to be thankful for. As for the rest of it, well…like many of you, we are ready for this year to be over!

When Voles Attack

11 Aug

Summer harvest is just about done this year on the farm. And while the stress of that time of the year is winding up, the beginning of the next crop year is starting all over again.

When we sat down last fall to make decisions surrounding our acres, we had no idea how much dirt we were going to have to work this year. But we have come up against a pest that is forcing our hand and is changing our plans. Many of our tall fescue fields are slated to stay in the ground 7-10 years. This year however we are taking out a lot of acres before that end date due to one small, tiny, seemingly innocent little pest; the vole.

Auggie was out “mice stomping” while we were cutting the grass. I was all for it, that is until he asked how we could preserve one so he could keep it. (Puke)

We have voles every year. More often they are referred to as field mice. They are a nuisance, something that we try every year to control with bait. But this year, two to three weeks before harvest, their population exploded in our fields, and they began to quickly eat our crop.

You can see holes like this all over our fields.

We estimate that our worst hit fields lost about 30% in yield. Other farmers said they figured around 50-60% of their seed crop was destroyed by mouse damage. I’ve even heard that some fields weren’t even worth the diesel in the harvester to harvest the field. Which is heartbreaking.

So we have made the decision to take out some of our worst hit fields and use our last resort for control; habitat destruction. In other words we will be working up these fields, destroying the colonies where the mice live, and setting back their population. Also hoping that the population peaked and will go down to normal levels, saving the fields that we left in for harvest 2021.

As a farmers we often face new challenges from year to year. A few years ago we had army worms marching across our fields eating aces and acres of grass in a matter of days. Other years we have seen slugs decimate fields during a wet fall. All these challenges come unpredictably, so they can be difficult to prepare for. Mix that along with weather patterns that can make control options limited, it can be a challenge to protect your crops.

I haven’t heard of any earth shattering ways to kill vole populations that live and thrive underground. Beyond hiring a clowder (yeah I googled it….that’s a group of cats) of cats or a kettle (also googled) of hawks we don’t have a lot of options. We have the bait that we have always used and will be using that as much as we can on fields left in for next year’s harvest. But many times our hands are tied because our tools aren’t effective enough or work quickly enough when pressure is that high. Another good reason why farmers need “tools in their toolbox” when it comes to pest management.

I’m sure next year we will find ourselves with yet another challenge. Maybe it will be something like grass seed eating zombies. You know, something that has more proven science about how to kill them. Unless zombies eat voles….hmmmmm.

The Start to Harvest & Dinner in the Field

9 Jul

Harvest like most of 2020 hasn’t proven to be “the best” quite yet. The weather has been questionable for the start to summer; which has made it a slow start for harvesting our seed crops.

I looked up at my dinner menu today and had to laugh. It looks like this….

And to be seeing that just a few days into harvest makes me want to scream and (mostly) laugh all at once. It will all get done, I know that. But the stress level of farming can drastically change from day to day and even hour to hour this time of year. Which means I am either cooking for 10 to go or cooking for 5 for at home. Which as I’m writing this doesn’t seem like a lot, but the beer you have to pack for “to go”…it’s a lot (haha!).

So for now I will just keep waiting for that sun to shine, just like pretty much every farmer here in the Willamette Valley and if you’re hungry, and can follow that menu, send me your orders 😉

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